BREAST REDUCTION

A female Breast Reduction (Reduction Mammaplasty) is considered by women who wish to relieve the uncomfortable physical symptoms often associated with very large breasts. Breasts are made smaller, firmer and more proportional to the rest of the body. Techniques for breast reduction vary, but the most common procedure involves an anchor-shaped incision that circles the areola, extends downward, and follows the natural curve of the crease beneath the breast. The surgeon removes excess glandular tissue, fat and skin, and moves the nipple and areola into their new position. The physician then brings the skin from both sides of the breast down and around the areola, shaping the new contour of the breast. Liposuction may be used to remove excess fat from the armpit area. In most cases, the nipples remain attached to their blood vessels and nerves.

However, if the breasts are very large or pendulous, the nipples and areolas may have to be completely removed and grafted into a higher position. (This will result in a loss of sensation in the nipple and areolar tissue.)

A female Breast Reduction is usually an outpatient surgery using general anesthesia with preparations and procedure encompassing 2 to 4 hours. Stitches are usually located around the areola, in a vertical line extending downward, and along the lower crease of the breast. The procedure does leave noticeable, permanent scars, although they’ll be covered by your bra or bathing suit. (Poor healing and wider scars are more common in smokers).

Side Effects & Risks

Breast reduction is not a simple operation, but it’s normally safe when performed by a qualified plastic surgeon. Nevertheless, as with any surgery, there is always a possibility of complications, including bleeding, infection, or reaction to the anesthesia. Some patients develop small sores around their nipples after surgery; these can be treated with antibiotic creams. You can reduce your risks by closely following your physician’s advice both before and after surgery. The procedure can also leave you with slightly mismatched breasts or unevenly positioned nipples. Future breast-feeding may not be possible, since the surgery removes many of the milk ducts leading to the nipples. Some patients may experience a permanent loss of feeling in their nipples or breasts. Rarely, the nipple and areola may lose their blood supply and the tissue will die. (The nipple and areola can usually be rebuilt, however, using skin grafts from elsewhere on the body.)

Alternative Procedures